Human Race History

Human skeletal remains were found in gold-bearing gravels of the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. Table Mountain ins Toulumne County has yielded radiometric dates of 9 million years, while the prevolcanic auriferous gravels just above the bedrock had yielded dates of 33 — 35 million years.

J. D. Whitney examined a collection belonging to Dr. Snell, consisting of stone spoons, handles, spearheads, and a human jaw — all found in the auriferous gravels beneath the latite cap of Tuolumne Table Mountain. All of the human fossils uncovered in the gold-mining region, including this one, were of the anatomically modern type. The gravels from which the jaw came could be anywhere from 9 to 55 millions years old.

Gold chains embedded in lumps of coal and iron nails in granite as well as fossils of hand sewn shoe impressions in stone still confound the experts of all groups. All of these finds are millions of years old. Even a copper coin with an Indian figure on it with strange writing has come up from 300 feet deep well shafts.

Human Race History

Memories—The Last Passenger Train

Most of my memories are about life in Gordon, Ohio. I lived on a street right beside the railroad track. The train had to blow its whistle before it crossed State Route 722 so we always heard it each day except on weekends when it didn’t run. The train was called the D&U and it rattled mom’s dishes in the cupboard as it passed our house. The little train hauled U.S. Army trucks and jeeps on their way to the New York Central or Pennsylvania Railroads in Arcanum or Greenville. They would ride the rails and travel across oceans before they ended up on a battlefield overseas.

Sometimes a passenger car would be attached to the freight train. Gordon was famous in the area for the different hardwood trees that grew in the forests around town. The people who worked at the steam powered saw mills stayed at one of the many boarding houses during the week and went home on weekends. Our neighbors ran a restaurant in town that catered to these workers and always offered hot coffee and sandwiches to anyone in town.

There were serious drunken brawls and one man sliced open the stomach of his antagonizer who then walked from the south end of town to North Street holding his innards inside lest they fall out of his belly. There was a couple of saloons where hard liquor flowed freely and caused problems but local women who belonged to the Women’s Christian Temperance Union got together and set dynamite off at one saloon and blew the entire front off the building.

The glory days of Gordon, Ohio were over when the saw mills closed and the tile factory shut down. Some people remember the peanut butter factory and the creameries but Townsends Chocolate cake mixes were a thing of the past by the time I walked from my house to get the mail from the post office on Perry Street. I didn’t know it then but the person elected to office chose who would run the post office in Gordon and it was a plum a was passed around after each election.

I do recall my mother called me outside to wave to the last passenger train to go through Gordon. Each car was decked out with stars and stripes and the gentlemen wore suits and top hats and the ladies wore billowing dresses and held parasols to protect them from the black smoke and soot belching out of the steam engine.

The coal the train burned to make steam that ran the locomotive was the same stuff we burned in our kitchen cook stoves and in our heating stoves in the living room. We sat there, during the war and listened to favorite radio programs and watched the dial like people watch television today. We had to imagine everything in that dial and each person saw and heard things the rest of us didn’t know about.

It was a big deal to get to town on Saturday night and most people took a bath in a galvanized tub on the kitchen floor in water heated on the stove in big teakettles. They wore their Sunday best clothes when they went to town to see what the different stores had to sell.

Memories—The Last Passenger Train

Shingles

shingles

Pat has the Shingles and today is the third day. She said her skin feels sore and it is like something is being jabbed into it. And she said she also feels like she has a bad sunburn. This is how they looked the other day.

Shingles

Storm Door

We ordered a new storm door for the front entrance. The one we have is impressive with a full sheet of glass for winter that can be replaced with a full sheet of screen for summer weather. The problem with it is that getting the glass or the screen out and the other in is really hard to do. It usually took at least two people to get the strips in the door that locks the screen or the glass in place. The difficulty in taking one out and putting one is caused us not to use the screen last summer and with no other way to ventilate the room, we had to use air all the time or we could not stay in the room.
The new door should be installed this week. A man will come out and measure the door entrance to make sure the door we ordered will fit and work in the space provided. Once he finishes measurements then he will install the door we ordered. I am hopeful it will be this week.

Storm Door

My Dad

abesdad1

My Dad passed away in June 1955. He died about a month before Patty and I were married on July 12, 1955 so it is always easy to remember how long he has been gone. He was married at least 5 times to different women and lost a lot of money buying them cars and having their homes remodeled. He chewed Mail Pouch chewing tobacco. They say he died from cancer in his stomach and prostate.

My Dad